The CBC Respects Dignity Better than Corporate Media

Corporate media, being owned by corporations, needs to maximize shareholder wealth. That means news is a loss leader.

News is about generating sensationalism, excitement or hysteria.

News is about generating ratings to charge more for advertising to maximize shareholder wealth.

Thus, when the CBC characteristically doesn’t sensationalize something, it’s noted around the world.

CBC is owned by us, WE are the shareholders. WE maximize wealth by having high quality, respectful journalism that enhances dignity. Not like the Jerry Springer that corporate media has become.

So, read this, especially the last line:

Mansbridge, in sharp contrast to the frenetic, breathless delivery we’ve come to expect from American news anchors in times of breaking news (including stories of far less significance than the attacks in Canada), was thoughtful, took his time, and seemed at times to pause, and to consider his words before speaking. Just. Imagine. That. Around 1:30 ET, three-and-a-half hours into his coverage, Mansbridge paused to update viewers. “What do we know with certainty right now?” There was no place for exaggeration, rumor, or mistakes. It was like watching grown-up news. And suddenly, seeing it, I was struck by how often we don’t see it here in the U.S. It’s been a long time since American anchors like Frank Reynolds said “let’s nail it down…let’s get it right.”

Even if it means letting someone else report it first.

Canada’s CBC News Shows What Thoughtful Breaking News Coverage Really Looks Like – TVNewser.

Climate Change Science Deniers, Ignorance and Media’s False Balance

Climate change deniers are science deniers.

That makes them either stupid, or so incredibly biased/conflicted that they are willing to ignore science and dodge accusations of their own stupidity to accomplish some other goal.

In BC we are producing oil, gas and coal and stunningly stupid rates, only to go up in the future.

Our corporate media is spewing this “false balance” at us. Journalists who deny the scientific truth of climate change should be fired. But corporate media want to keep them on.

We need to continually inoculate our against this wilful ignorance.

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The Big LNG Tax Regime Vomit Bucket

Cue sweet new day[tm] political campaign music, invoking images of a unicorn flying over our quaint village, then Robert Redford in voiceover:

“LNG will be a $ trillion sector, reaping billions in revenue for the province [due to some kind of gruelling tax regime] so we can become debt-free, and pay for the best public services in the solar system, and bring trade junkets to the Golden Temple of Amritsar thrice yearly!”

Cue Law and Order “Bum Bum” loop:

After months of delays, release the actual tax rates. [Place face in palm, in advance.]

  1. It will never be over 7%, because, shut up.
  2. It will be 1.5% until LNG plant startup costs are paid off; and if the company is any good, it will delay that break even for about 76 years.
  3. Once the mythical startup costs are recouped, taxes rocket up to 3.5%.
  4. Then they hit the stratosphere of 5%, after 23 years!
  5. But wait, there’s more!
  6. Sneak in a special 3% tax credit, making the gruelling tax regime look like this: -1.5% for a really long time, then +0.5%, then +2% in 23 years. But maybe the math is a bit off because it’s so hard working with numbers that are so small.
  7. Money shot.

Begin slow clap.

Reducing the taxes to compete with other producing jurisdictions is called the race to the bottom. But the spin doctors call it:

A necessary response to changing market conditions

via Smyth: Turns out the LNG bonanza promised by the Liberals won’t be as spectacular.

Then, stick the spin doctors in a room with a case of Red Bull and a Bellini machine to produce the winning defensive attack:

Suggest with your crafty rhetoric that opposing the LNG tax regime is like killing babies.

De Jong suggested the New Democrats would have strangled the LNG baby in its cradle if they had won the election.

via Smyth: Turns out the LNG bonanza promised by the Liberals won’t be as spectacular.

It’s Miller Time.

Harper, the Dog of War

For Harper, 6 CF-18s in Kuwait, all war all the time, phoning up the Pentagon asking where we can become more militarily engaged…all these things lead to a war posture, including a soldier being killed at home.

A war posture is good for Harper’s base and makes Canadians more scared so that we more more disinclined to vote him out next year.

Don’t change horses in midstream, as the sick spin goes.

Expect Harper to manufacture/inflame more political strife and militarism in the months leading up to the federal election.

All of us should be profoundly uncomfortable that any politician would be speaking about this tragedy – and assigning motive – before the police. That is not the way our system works. And it raises the distinct possibility that Harper and his advisors are willing to reduce a soldier’s death to a talking point.

via We live in dangerous times | Warren Kinsella.

Join Ricochet: A new take on independent media.

Have you joined yet?

No? So, you’re good with corporate media spinning things for you, against your personal, community, national and ecological interests?

Oh. Ok. :)

Ricochet is an audacious response to a difficult context. Independent and in the public interest, Ricochet will provide a space dedicated to investigative journalism and high-profile opinion. Published in two distinct editions, English and French, Ricochet will illuminate the cultural and political diversity of this country.

via Ricochet: le journal nouveau genre. A new take on independent media. | Indiegogo.

If You Read But One Thing About Universal Childcare This Week

Line them up here. In this one section of universal childcare analysis by one of the smartest people in the country, Michal Rozworski, we see a number of significant policy issues addressed:

  1. affordable childcare.
  2. universality.
  3. feminism.
  4. including mothers in the workforce more effectively.
  5. a better shot a living wage for childcare workers.
  6. national standards.
  7. standardized curricula and best practices.
  8. economies of scale [for those obsessed with the business plan]

Ultimately, a winning paragraph in a winning analytical piece

While caring for children is an essential task, it is also an unequally distributed chore according to gender and made difficult by unequal material circumstances. A universal system of childcare would at least give more mothers more choice about how to use their time and facilitate their participation in the workforce if they choose. In addition, and especially if it were publicly delivered, it could improve working conditions for childcare workers, standardize curricula and levels of care and increase efficiency via economies of scale.

Why the NDP’s childcare proposal has irritated all the right people | Ricochet.

Transportation After Fossil Fuels: A Decade Away?

Once upon a time, I rode the maglev at the Japan pavilion at Expo 86.

Since then, I’ve come to see that that was the Commodore Vic 20 of high speed travel. What’s the new standard? ET3.

So if you’ve been having a hard time imagining a post-carbon transportation system that would run on the electricity we’d glean from the wind and the sun, and cost about as much as one year of Air Canada’s gross revenue [$12.4 billion in 2013], start grinning when you read the quote at the bottom.

We could even fund it federally with a 5-year dedicated 1% increase in revenue from corporate taxes. The federal government 2012-13 $256 billion budget earned 13.6% of revenue from corporations [and 49% from personal income tax!!!]. This is not brain surgery, folks.

The Hyperloop has been vaguely described by Musk as a “cross between a Concorde, a rail gun, and an air hockey table.” A better description might be an elevated tube system with a magnetic levitation system similar to high-speed bullet trains. The kicker would be the enclosed tube, which would provide a nearly friction-less surface for individual capsules to travel in.

ET3′s Hyperloop-like project already has a number of schematics and plans already in place. They claim an automobile-sized, six-passenger capsule constructed for “outer space” travel conditions could easily reach speeds of 4,000 miles per hour on longer journeys across the country or across continents. In theory, this elevated tube system could be built for a tenth of the cost of high-speed rail and a quarter the cost of a freeway. The projected cost for a passenger to travel from Los Angeles to New York is $100.

LA To NYC In Under An Hour, Hyperloop System Will Let You Travel At 4,000 MPH | Industry Tap.

How to Spot an Ecology Troll

  1. Start with an oil spill apologist/minimizer.
  2. Work with the twisted logic that since all ships and oil tankers don’t crash all the time, any concern over one that might [and our government's pathetic incompetence in prevention and disaster-aversion] is eco-hysteria.
  3. Pay any attention to and RT anything Ayn Rand.
  4. Then spot allied apologists.

Then follow the timelines:

[Timeliness note: as of 115pm, the third tow line on the Simushir snapped, so nothing's safe yet.]

 

Transit Should Be Free; Until Then…

$1/day is a good start to get there.

  1. It’s good for the environment.
  2. It reduces commuter stress.
  3. It forces governments to increase progressive taxation to cover infrastructure costs.
  4. It uses BC’s cheap hydro electricity.
  5. It combats rampant zombie consumerism.
  6. The post-secondary UPass system has improved commuting incredibly.

So $1/day is a good start to get there:

Mayoral candidate Meena Wong of COPE launched another populist proposal Wednesday, calling for a universal transit program that would cost each of Vancouver’s citizens $1 per day.

De-Spinning the Political and Re-Spinning it for Social, Economic and Political Justice